Intergalactic Arts & Crafts

Rule #89// Pronounce it Correctly.
All races shall be referred to by the name given in its country of origin, and care shall be taken to pronounce the name as well as possible. For Belgian Races, it is preferable to choose the name given in its region of origin, though it is at the speaker’s discretion to use either the Flemish or Wallonian pronunciation. This principle shall also be extended to apply to riders’ names, bicycle and component marquees, and cycling accoutrements.

Paris[ pa-ree ]   Roubaix[ roo-be ]Rule #89// Pronounce it Correctly.
All races shall be referred to by the name given in its country of origin, and care shall be taken to pronounce the name as well as possible. For Belgian Races, it is preferable to choose the name given in its region of origin, though it is at the speaker’s discretion to use either the Flemish or Wallonian pronunciation. This principle shall also be extended to apply to riders’ names, bicycle and component marquees, and cycling accoutrements.

Paris[ pa-ree ]   Roubaix[ roo-be ]

Rule #89// Pronounce it Correctly.
All races shall be referred to by the name given in its country of origin, and care shall be taken to pronounce the name as well as possible. For Belgian Races, it is preferable to choose the name given in its region of origin, though it is at the speaker’s discretion to use either the Flemish or Wallonian pronunciation. This principle shall also be extended to apply to riders’ names, bicycle and component marquees, and cycling accoutrements.

Paris[ pa-ree ] Roubaix[ roo-be ]


In normal road races teams normally run 110psi and above, dependent on rider weight and the tyre of choice. But for Roubaix they can’t run pressures anywhere near 110psi (7.5 bar). Pressures closer to 4.5 bar to 4.8 bar (65-69.5psi) are more common, but again it depends on rider weight and weather conditions. If you’ve ever ridden a standard road tyre at this pressure you would notice how soft and slow it rolls. But this is what is required at Paris-Roubaix — the tubular needs to deform over the cobbles.

In normal road races teams normally run 110psi and above, dependent on rider weight and the tyre of choice. But for Roubaix they can’t run pressures anywhere near 110psi (7.5 bar). Pressures closer to 4.5 bar to 4.8 bar (65-69.5psi) are more common, but again it depends on rider weight and weather conditions. If you’ve ever ridden a standard road tyre at this pressure you would notice how soft and slow it rolls. But this is what is required at Paris-Roubaix — the tubular needs to deform over the cobbles.


To commemorate his last season as a professional racer, Team Garmin-Sharp’s David Millar has teamed up with fi’zi:k and the Small Steps Project charity whose agenda is to help underprivileged and desperate children and adults get off the rubbish heap –literally.To commemorate his last season as a professional racer, Team Garmin-Sharp’s David Millar has teamed up with fi’zi:k and the Small Steps Project charity whose agenda is to help underprivileged and desperate children and adults get off the rubbish heap –literally.To commemorate his last season as a professional racer, Team Garmin-Sharp’s David Millar has teamed up with fi’zi:k and the Small Steps Project charity whose agenda is to help underprivileged and desperate children and adults get off the rubbish heap –literally.To commemorate his last season as a professional racer, Team Garmin-Sharp’s David Millar has teamed up with fi’zi:k and the Small Steps Project charity whose agenda is to help underprivileged and desperate children and adults get off the rubbish heap –literally.

To commemorate his last season as a professional racer, Team Garmin-Sharp’s David Millar has teamed up with fi’zi:k and the Small Steps Project charity whose agenda is to help underprivileged and desperate children and adults get off the rubbish heap –literally.



Rule #52
// Drink in Moderation.



Bidons are to be small in size. 500ml maximum, no extra large vessels are to be seen on one’s machine. Two cages can be mounted, but only one bidon on rides under two hours is to be employed. Said solo bidon must be placed in the downtube cage only. You may only ride with a bidon in the rear cage if you have a front bidon, or you just handed your front bidon to a fan at the roadside and you are too busy crushing everyone to move it forward until you take your next drink. Bidons should match each other and preferably your bike and/or kit. The obvious exception is the classic Coca-Cola bidon which by default matches any bike and/or kit due to its heritage. Coca-Cola should only be consumed flat and near the end of a long ride or all-day solo breakaway on the roads of France.
View Larger
Rule #52
// Drink in Moderation.

Bidons are to be small in size. 500ml maximum, no extra large vessels are to be seen on one’s machine. Two cages can be mounted, but only one bidon on rides under two hours is to be employed. Said solo bidon must be placed in the downtube cage only. You may only ride with a bidon in the rear cage if you have a front bidon, or you just handed your front bidon to a fan at the roadside and you are too busy crushing everyone to move it forward until you take your next drink. Bidons should match each other and preferably your bike and/or kit. The obvious exception is the classic Coca-Cola bidon which by default matches any bike and/or kit due to its heritage. Coca-Cola should only be consumed flat and near the end of a long ride or all-day solo breakaway on the roads of France.



Rule #40
// Tires are to be mounted with the label centered over the valve stem.



Pro mechanics do it because it makes it easier to find the valve. You do this because that’s the way pro mechanics do it. This will save you precious seconds while your fat ass sits on the roadside fumbling with your CO2 after a flat. It also looks better for photo opportunities. Note: This obviously only applies to clinchers as tubulars don’t give you a choice.
View Larger
Rule #40
// Tires are to be mounted with the label centered over the valve stem.

Pro mechanics do it because it makes it easier to find the valve. You do this because that’s the way pro mechanics do it. This will save you precious seconds while your fat ass sits on the roadside fumbling with your CO2 after a flat. It also looks better for photo opportunities. Note: This obviously only applies to clinchers as tubulars don’t give you a choice.



Rule #91
// No Food On Training Rides Under Four Hours.



This one also comes from the Apostle, Johan Museeuw, who said to @frank: “Yes, no food on rides under four hours. You need to lose some weight.” Or, as Fignon put it, sometimes, when we train, we simply have to go out to meet the Man with the Hammer. The exception is, of course, hard rides over two hours and races. Also, if you’re planning on being out for more than four hours, start eating before you get hungry. This also applies to energy drink supplements.
View Larger
Rule #91
// No Food On Training Rides Under Four Hours.

This one also comes from the Apostle, Johan Museeuw, who said to @frank: “Yes, no food on rides under four hours. You need to lose some weight.” Or, as Fignon put it, sometimes, when we train, we simply have to go out to meet the Man with the Hammer. The exception is, of course, hard rides over two hours and races. Also, if you’re planning on being out for more than four hours, start eating before you get hungry. This also applies to energy drink supplements.


A contemporary road bike has to have a solid build to survive a northern Classic. The mechanics from the pro teams always double-check that bolts are tight and tyres are pumped hard – but not too hard – just right.
Tyres are a couple of millimetres wider. Bar tape is thicker. Maybe a carbon seatpin is swapped for a heavier but more crashable aluminium version. But that’s about it – basic, no frills. A contemporary road bike has to have a solid build to survive a northern Classic. The mechanics from the pro teams always double-check that bolts are tight and tyres are pumped hard – but not too hard – just right.
Tyres are a couple of millimetres wider. Bar tape is thicker. Maybe a carbon seatpin is swapped for a heavier but more crashable aluminium version. But that’s about it – basic, no frills. 

A contemporary road bike has to have a solid build to survive a northern Classic. The mechanics from the pro teams always double-check that bolts are tight and tyres are pumped hard – but not too hard – just right.

Tyres are a couple of millimetres wider. Bar tape is thicker. Maybe a carbon seatpin is swapped for a heavier but more crashable aluminium version. But that’s about it – basic, no frills. 



Rule #56
// Espresso or macchiato only.



When wearing cycling kit and enjoying a pre or post ride coffee, it is only appropriate to drink espresso or macchiato. If the word soy/skim latte is heard to be used by a member wearing cycling apparel, then that person must be ceremonially beaten with Co2 canisters or mini pumps by others within the community.
View Larger
Rule #56
// Espresso or macchiato only.

When wearing cycling kit and enjoying a pre or post ride coffee, it is only appropriate to drink espresso or macchiato. If the word soy/skim latte is heard to be used by a member wearing cycling apparel, then that person must be ceremonially beaten with Co2 canisters or mini pumps by others within the community.


TIPS FOR DEALING WITH CONCUSSION
If you are concussed while riding (or if you have hit your head and might have sustained a concussion) you should consider the following steps:
1. Drop out of the race / stop riding2. Recognise the symptoms of concussion3. See a doctor4. Understand when it’s safe to ride again5. Know that concussion may not always resolve quickly.
Remember, these comments are “tips” and do not replace proper medical advice, which should be obtained immediately after a concussion occurs.
All level of amateur and professional cyclists face the risk of concussion, and cycling’s love of “suffering”, while a noble trait in our sport, may also be its most dangerous aspect.
Remember, getting off the bike won’t kill you, but if you’re concussed, staying on it might. View Larger

TIPS FOR DEALING WITH CONCUSSION

If you are concussed while riding (or if you have hit your head and might have sustained a concussion) you should consider the following steps:

1. Drop out of the race / stop riding
2. Recognise the symptoms of concussion
3. See a doctor
4. Understand when it’s safe to ride again
5. Know that concussion may not always resolve quickly.

Remember, these comments are “tips” and do not replace proper medical advice, which should be obtained immediately after a concussion occurs.

All level of amateur and professional cyclists face the risk of concussion, and cycling’s love of “suffering”, while a noble trait in our sport, may also be its most dangerous aspect.

Remember, getting off the bike won’t kill you, but if you’re concussed, staying on it might.



Rule #10
// It never gets easier, you just go faster.



As this famous quote by Greg LeMan tells us, training, climbing, and racing is hard. It stays hard. To put it another way, per Greg Henderson: “Training is like fighting with a gorilla. You don’t stop when you’re tired. You stop when the gorilla is tired.” 
View Larger
Rule #10
// It never gets easier, you just go faster.

As this famous quote by Greg LeMan tells us, training, climbing, and racing is hard. It stays hard. To put it another way, per Greg Henderson: “Training is like fighting with a gorilla. You don’t stop when you’re tired. You stop when the gorilla is tired.”